January 27, 2022

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Zimbabwe Travel Advisory

9 min read

Reconsider travel to Zimbabwe due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Zimbabwe due to crime and civil unrest.   

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Zimbabwe due to COVID-19.

Zimbabwe has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Zimbabwe.

Violent crime, such as assault, carjacking, and home invasion, is common. Smashing the windows of cars with the intent to steal, which can harm the driver or passengers, is also common.

Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Zimbabwe:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Stay alert and avoid openly displaying cash.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Stay away from political rallies, demonstrations, and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Zimbabwe.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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