January 25, 2022

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Zambia Travel Advisory

8 min read

Reconsider travel to Zambia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Zambia due to COVID-19.

Zambia has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Zambia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Zambia:

See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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