December 4, 2021

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Zambia Independence Day

9 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Zambia on the occasion of your Independence Day.  Zambia’s unshakeable commitment to democratic ideals is an inspiration to all who seek the freedom, prosperity, and justice that democracy offers.

As President Biden said in his address before the 76th United Nations General Assembly, democracy remains the best tool we have to unleash our full human potential.  Nowhere is that more evident than in Zambia, where this year a record number of young and first-time voters demanded a return to the principles upon which their country was founded more than half a century ago.  As we celebrate their bravery, we also welcome the opportunity to further expand our bilateral relationship.

Today, we honor Zambia’s past, even as we look forward to a brighter future for the Zambian people.

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