December 9, 2021

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Young Houstonian sent to prison for nearly 20 years

20 min read
A 24-year-old Houston man has been ordered to federal prison following his convictions on robbery, brandishing and discharging a firearm during a crime of violence

Read full article at: https://www.justice.gov November 22, 2021
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