January 27, 2022

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Warsaw Process Humanitarian Issues and Refugees Working Group Convenes in Brasilia

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The United States, Brazil, and Poland convened the Warsaw Process Humanitarian Issues and Refugees Working Group in Brasilia, Brazil February 4-6.  The working group focused on education and protection for children who are disproportionately affected by conflict in humanitarian crises in the Middle East.  Participants included more than 33 countries as well as several international and non-governmental organizations.  They discussed innovative solutions to current challenges, recognizing the need to better provide psychological support to children during displacement.  The United States thanks Brazil for its leadership in hosting the Refugee Working Group.

The United States and Poland launched the Warsaw Process in February 2019, following the Ministerial to Promote a Future of Peace and Security in the Middle East.  The initiative, which consists of seven expert-level working groups, is promoting stability in the Middle East through meaningful multilateralism that fosters deeper regional and global collaboration.

Click here for the text of the working group statement released following the conclusion of the meeting.  The Humanitarian Issues and Refugees Working Group will continue to facilitate cooperation on humanitarian and refugee issues with regional actors in advance of a second Warsaw Process ministerial in 2020.

 

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