January 19, 2022

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Vietnam Travel Advisory

5 min read

Reconsider travel to Vietnam due to COVID-19

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Vietnam due to COVID-19. 

Vietnam’s borders are still closed for all foreign nationals with few exceptions. Vietnam has resumed most domestic transportation options (including airports) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Vietnam.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Vietnam.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Vietnam:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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