January 20, 2022

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Vanuatu Travel Advisory

10 min read

Reconsider travel to Vanuatu due to COVID-19

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Vanuatu due to COVID-19.   

Vanuatu has lifted stay at home orders and resumed business operations. Only repatriation flights organized by the Vanuatu government are operating on an occasional basis. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Vanuatu.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Vanuatu:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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