December 3, 2021

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United States to Host Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment Conference

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of President Biden, we announced today that the United States will host the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria’s (Global Fund) Seventh Replenishment Conference in 2022.  This is an important moment, as next year marks the twentieth anniversary of the establishment of the Global Fund, of which the United States is a founding member and the largest donor.  Since 2004, the United States has contributed $17 billion to the Global Fund, comprising 33 percent of all donor contributions.  The U.S. Congress recently appropriated $3.5 billion for a U.S. contribution to the Global Fund in the American Rescue Plan for COVID-19 related programming, in addition to its regular appropriations in support. 

The Global Fund, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) continue to play pivotal roles in responding to the HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria epidemics. They also remain critical contributors to the ongoing global COVID-19 response and to global health security.

Since the Global Fund’s inception, more than 80 countries have made or pledged contributions to support its efforts against AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. It provides a vital complement to U.S. bilateral foreign assistance, increasing the total funding available to address key global health challenges. 

By closely coordinating Global Fund resources with other U.S. global health investments — including those directed through PEPFAR, PMI, and our bilateral tuberculosis programs — we have not only made remarkable progress in preventing and treating three of the leading infectious disease killers on the planet, but also strengthened local health systems, global health security, and pandemic preparedness and response.

The United States looks forward to working with the Global Fund and other donors worldwide to deliver on the promise of a robust Seventh Replenishment Conference.

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