December 9, 2021

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United States Settles Clean Water Act Claims Against Fishing Companies, Manager and Vessel Chief Engineer for Violations in American Samoa

14 min read
<div>San Diego-based JM Fisheries LLC, G.S. Fisheries Inc., the companies’ manager, and the chief engineer of the commercial fishing vessel Capt. Vincent Gann have agreed to pay a total of $725,000 in civil penalties to settle federal Clean Water Act claims related to oil pollution violations on the vessel. The companies and their manager have also agreed to perform corrective measures to prevent future Clean Water Act violations.   </div>
San Diego-based JM Fisheries LLC, G.S. Fisheries Inc., the companies’ manager, and the chief engineer of the commercial fishing vessel Capt. Vincent Gann have agreed to pay a total of $725,000 in civil penalties to settle federal Clean Water Act claims related to oil pollution violations on the vessel. The companies and their manager have also agreed to perform corrective measures to prevent future Clean Water Act violations.   

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