January 20, 2022

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United States – Iceland Economic Partnership Dialogue

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Today, the United States and Iceland held the third bilateral Economic Partnership Dialogue, led by Economic and Business Affairs Senior Bureau Official Matt Murray and Icelandic Director General for External Trade and Economic Affairs Ragnar Kristjánsson.  The United States and Iceland jointly addressed global challenges of mutual concern, including pandemic recovery and its effects on trade, economic and trade relations, investment security and protecting critical infrastructure, and green energy solutions to tackle the climate crisis.  The United States and Iceland committed to continue to build upon their existing strong economic ties and bilateral cooperation.

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