January 20, 2022

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United States Hosts December 2-8 Lead-Up Events in Advance of Summit for Democracy

16 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

President Biden pledged to host a Summit for Democracy to reinforce our commitment to placing democracy and human rights at the center of U.S. foreign policy.  It reflects President Biden’s deeply held belief that to tackle the world’s most pressing challenges, democracies must come together, learn together, stand together, and act together.  The December 9-10 virtual Summit will bring together 110 participants, representing diverse democratic governing experiences around the world, as well as civil society and private sector leaders.

In advance of the virtual Summit, the United States — represented by Departments and agencies across the U.S. Government — will join a wide spectrum of advocates, journalists, private sector, and members of civil society from around the world, as well as lawmakers and local government officials, in hosting official side events about democratic renewal.  The United States is pleased to highlight 19 events that will catalyze action across the Summit pillars: strengthening democracy and defending against authoritarianism, fighting corruption, and promoting respect for human rights.

Unless otherwise indicated, events are open to the public, and access details can be found on the Summit’s website at https://www.state.gov/summit-for-democracy/.

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