December 4, 2021

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United States Condemns Violence Against Peaceful Protesters in Sudan

13 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States strongly condemns the violent crackdown by security forces against peaceful protesters on November 17, which resulted in at least 15 deaths and scores of injuries.  We express our condolences to the families of those who lost their lives.  This follows several other instances of violence against peaceful protesters since the military seized power on October 25.  We call for those responsible for human rights abuses and violations, including the excessive use of force against peaceful protesters, to be held accountable.

In advance of upcoming protests, we call on Sudanese authorities to use restraint and allow peaceful demonstrations.  The Sudanese people have the right to peacefully assemble and should be free to voice their opinions without fear of violence, reprisal, or recrimination.

We stand with the people of Sudan as they seek to bring the country’s democratic transition back on track.  We once again call for the immediate restoration of Sudan’s civilian transition to democracy, including the return of Prime Minister Hamdok to office, and the release of those detained since October 25.

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