January 20, 2022

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United Arab Emirates Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to the United Arab Emirates due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for  the United Arab Emirates due to COVID-19.  

The United Arab Emirates has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within the United Arab Emirates. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the United Arab Emirates.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including the United Arab Emirates, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the UAE:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

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