January 19, 2022

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Under Secretary Hale’s Call with Moldovan President-Elect Sandu

18 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale spoke today with Moldovan President-elect Maia Sandu. Under Secretary Hale congratulated President-elect Sandu on her victory in the November 15 presidential election, and noted the U.S. commitment to advancing cooperation on shared priorities including the rule of law, combatting corruption, fostering economic growth, and supporting Moldova’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.

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