January 22, 2022

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Uganda Travel Advisory

13 min read

Reconsider travel to Uganda due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Uganda due to crime and kidnapping.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for Uganda due to COVID-19.

Uganda has resumed most internal transportation options, but the international airport and borders remain, with some exceptions, closed to regular travel. Most business operations have resumed, however day cares and schools remain closed. Other improved conditions have been reported within Uganda. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Uganda.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, home invasion, kidnapping, and sexual assault, is common, especially in larger cities including Kampala and Entebbe. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Uganda:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Food and drinks should never be left unattended in public especially in local clubs.
  • Remain with a group of friends in public.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Uganda.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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