January 19, 2022

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U.S. Welcomes Guatemala’s Designation of Hizballah as a Terrorist Organization

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

We commend Guatemala for designating Hizballah as a terrorist organization in its entirety and demonstrating resolve in countering this dangerous terrorist group.  This important step will help cut off Hizballah’s ability to plot terrorist attacks and to raise money around the world, including in the Western Hemisphere.

With this designation, Guatemala joins a growing list of nations that have recognized Hizballah for what it is – not a defender of Lebanon, but a transnational terrorist organization dedicated to advancing Iran’s malicious agenda.  Like al-Qaida and ISIS, Hizballah has a global reach – in recent years operations and plots have been disrupted in the Americas, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

The United States continues to call on its partners to designate Hizballah in its entirety, and to recognize that there is no distinction between its so-called “military” and “political” wings.  We urge all countries to take whatever action they can to prevent Hizballah operatives, recruiters, and financiers from operating in their territories.

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