January 22, 2022

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U.S. Welcomes First Meeting of the Afghanistan High Council for National Reconciliation Leadership Committee

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes the formation and the first Leadership Committee meeting of the Afghanistan High Council for National Reconciliation today. This inclusive body is chaired by Dr. Abdullah Abdullah. Afghan leaders across the political spectrum have unified to make decisions and mobilize support for a just and lasting peace.  All sides of the conflict should come together and chart a path to peace.

As an authoritative body on peace, the High Council and its Leadership Committee will provide counsel and guidance to the Islamic Republic negotiating team with the Taliban on the terms of an agreement on a political roadmap, power-sharing, and a permanent ceasefire to end the country’s long war.

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