January 20, 2022

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U.S. Vote Against the United Nations 2021 Program Budget

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Today, the United States called for a vote in the UN General Assembly to register strong objections to certain elements of the UN’s annual Program Budget. In particular, it is outrageous that the UN will fund in 2021 an event to promote the objectives of the Durban Declaration – a document saturated with anti-Semitism, anti-Israel bias, and hostility toward freedom of expression. Over the last 20 years, the United States has consistently opposed the corrosive Durban process. We call on all UN member states to seek new means to address constructively and inclusively the challenge of racism and racial discrimination. The United Nations should never serve as a platform for those determined to divide and diminish, but sadly that is all too often the case. For our part, we will continue to hold the United Nations to a higher standard.

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