January 22, 2022

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U.S.-Sudan Signing Ceremony on Bilateral Claims Agreement

11 min read

Cale Brown, Deputy Spokesperson

Last week, the United States and Sudan signed a bilateral agreement to resolve claims arising from the 1998 East Africa embassy bombings in Tanzania and Kenya. The agreement also provides for the transfer of compensation for victims of the 2000 attack on the USS Cole and the 2008 killing of U.S. Agency for International Development employee John Granville. This agreement is the culmination of more than a year of negotiations between both countries. It memorializes Sudan’s agreement to provide $335 million in compensation for victims of terrorism, which will be released to the United States following the rescission of Sudan’s State Sponsor of Terrorism designation and the enactment of legislation that would restore its immunities to those of a country not so designated.

We hope that this historic signing will facilitate a sense of justice and resolution for victims and their families, while helping to usher in a new chapter in the U.S.-Sudan relationship.

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