December 9, 2021

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U.S.-ROK Director General/Deputy-Level Consultation Meeting

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Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Deputy Special Representative (DS/R) for the DPRK Dr. Jung Pak hosted an interagency U.S.-ROK Director General (DG)/Deputy-Level Consultation meeting with ROK Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) DG for Korean Peninsula Peace Regime Rim Kap-soo on November 1. The ROK delegation included officials from MOFA, the Ministry of Unification, and Blue House. DS/R Pak was joined by National Security Council, Treasury, and Defense Department representatives. The two sides discussed the current situation on the Korean Peninsula; prospects for humanitarian cooperation; and the potential for dialogue with the DPRK.

This meeting further demonstrated the shared commitment between the United States and the Republic of Korea to advance our common goal of achieving complete denuclearization and permanent peace on the Korean Peninsula.

 

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