December 3, 2021

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U.S. Participation in the Fall 2021 Ad Hoc Liaison Committee Meeting for the Palestinians

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Office of the Spokesperson

The text of the following statement was released by the Government of the United States:

Today, a U.S. delegation attended the fall session of the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee Meeting (AHLC), hosted by the Kingdom of Norway. The U.S. delegation led by Deputy Assistant Secretary Hady Amr joined representatives of the Palestinian Authority, the Government of Israel, the European Union, and the UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, and other likeminded donors. The AHLC serves as an important opportunity for the international community to support economic development for Palestinians, with an eye towards improving the situation in Gaza. During the discussion, the United States reaffirmed the U.S. commitment to advance equal measures of prosperity, security and freedom for both Israelis and Palestinians alike, which is important in its own right but also as a means to advance towards a negotiated two-state solution in which Israel lives in peace and security alongside a viable Palestinian state. The United States underscored its commitment to work towards steps that will improve the lives of the Palestinian people, while urging all parties to avoid unilateral steps that aggravate tensions and make a negotiated two-state solution more difficult. We look forward to working with the Palestinians, Israelis, and international community as part of our broader efforts to improve the lives of Israelis and Palestinians alike.

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