December 4, 2021

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U.S. and Ukraine Agree to Establish a Secure Communications Link for Risk Reduction

17 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The U.S. Department of State and the Ukrainian State Service of Special Communications and Information Protection signed an Agreement for a 24/7 secure communications line through the National and Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (NNRRC).

Over the past three decades, the NNRRC’s work has grown to encompass notification regimes with more than 50 international partners on issues ranging from nuclear and conventional arms control, ballistic missile launch notifications, chemical weapons destruction, and international cyber incidents.  Working in seven languages, the NNRRC operates 24 hours a day to minimize the risk of armed conflict that could result from accident, miscalculation, or misunderstanding on a range of issues that impact international security.

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