December 4, 2021

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Two MS-13 Leaders Convicted of Racketeering Conspiracy and Conspiring to Commit Multiple Murders

12 min read
<div>Yesterday, a federal jury in Maryland convicted two El Salvadorian nationals for conspiring to participate in La Mara Salvatrucha, a transnational criminal enterprise, commonly known as MS-13.</div>
Yesterday, a federal jury in Maryland convicted two El Salvadorian nationals for conspiring to participate in La Mara Salvatrucha, a transnational criminal enterprise, commonly known as MS-13.

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