December 3, 2021

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Two Aryan Circle Gang Leaders Convicted on Racketeering Charges

12 min read
<div>A federal jury convicted a Texas man and a Missouri man on Tuesday of Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations charges stemming from their membership in the white supremacy prison gang, the Aryan Circle, between 2010 and 2021. </div>
A federal jury convicted a Texas man and a Missouri man on Tuesday of Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations charges stemming from their membership in the white supremacy prison gang, the Aryan Circle, between 2010 and 2021. 

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FTC, HHS, and NAIC provided technical comments, which GAO incorporated as appropriate. HHS provided additional written comments on a draft of this report. For more information, contact Seto Bagdoyan at (202)-6722 or bagdoyans@gao.gov.
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