January 19, 2022

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Tuvalu Travel Advisory

21 min read

Reconsider travel to Tuvalu due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Tuvalu due to COVID-19.  

Tuvalu has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Tuvalu.

Read the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Tuvalu:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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