January 22, 2022

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Turkmenistan Travel Advisory

7 min read

Do not travel to Turkmenistan due to COVID-19. Reconsider travel to Turkmenistan due to Embassy Ashgabat’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens. Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Turkmenistan due to COVID-19.

Travelers to Turkmenistan may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Turkmenistan due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Turkmenistan.

On March 27, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of all family members of U.S. government employees under the age of 18 in addition to the authorized departure of non-emergency personnel and family members of U.S. government employees due to stringent travel restrictions and quarantine procedures. Currently, international commercial flights have been suspended. Any special charter flights, including medical evacuation flights, must use Turkmenabat Airport which is 290 miles by air and 385 miles by road from Ashgabat. Please read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkmenistan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Have a plan to depart Turkmenistan that does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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