January 25, 2022

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Turkey Travel Advisory

15 min read

Reconsider travel to Turkey due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution when traveling to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Turkey due to COVID-19.

Turkey has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and reopening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Turkey. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Turkey.

Do not travel to:

  • Sirnak province, Hakkari province, and any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian border due to terrorism. (Level 4)

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government (including on social media) can result in arrest.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

Sirnak Province, Hakkari Province, and Any Area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Sirnak province, Hakkari province, or any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, and civil unrest. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, and illegal roadblocks leading to violence have occurred in these areas. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to these provinces and to any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border without prior approval.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to U.S. government restrictions on personnel.

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