January 19, 2022

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Tunisia Travel Advisory

19 min read

Reconsider travel to Tunisia due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution in Tunisia due to  terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Tunisia due to COVID-19.  

Tunisia has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Tunisia.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Tunisia.

Do not travel to:

  • Within 30 km of southeastern Tunisia along the border with Libya due to terrorism.
  • Mountainous areas in the country’s west, including the Chaambi Mountain National Park area, due to terrorism.
  • The desert south of Remada due to the military zone.
  • Jendouba south of Ain Drahem and west of RN15, El Kef, and Kasserine, next to the Algerian border due to terrorism.
  • Sidi Bou Zid in central Tunisia due to terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Tunisia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, museums, resorts, hotels, festivals, nightclubs, restaurants, religious sites, markets/shopping malls, government facilities and security forces. A country-wide state of emergency, which grants security forces more authority to maintain civil order and enables the government to focus on combating terrorism, is in effect. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in some areas of Tunisia. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside greater Tunis.  

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Tunisia:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Exercise caution when using public transportation, due to safety and security concerns.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Avoid staying overnight outside of the main cities and tourist locations.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Tunisia.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Border with Libya

Developments in Libya continue to affect the security situation along the Tunisian-Libyan border in areas such as Ras Jedir and Dehiba along with the cities of Ben Guerdan and Medenine. The border with Libya is frequently closed to all traffic with short notice for extended periods. The Department of State advises U.S. citizens not to travel to Libya. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Western Mountains and Chaambi Mountain National Park

Terrorist groups continue to operate in mountains of Western Tunisia. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The Desert South of Remada

The desert south of Remada is designated as a military zone by the Government of Tunisia. Special authorization is required for travelers wishing to enter the military zone.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jendouba El Kef and Kasserine near the Algerian Border

Terrorist groups continue to operate in these areas. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sidi Bou Zid in Central Tunisia

Terrorist groups continue to operate in this area. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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