December 4, 2021

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Travel of Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan

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Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Donald Booth will travel to South Sudan from May 9 to May 13, 2021. Special Envoy Booth will hold meetings with government officials, political stakeholders, and civil society and international partners.

The Special Envoy’s travel underscores the United States’ commitment to work with IGAD and other regional and international partners to support peace and stability in South Sudan.  Of particular concern to the United States is the slow implementation of the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan (R-ARCSS), ongoing violence, and deteriorating economic and humanitarian conditions.

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