December 3, 2021

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Three Charged with Mailing Fraudulent Prize Notices

10 min read
<div>The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York unsealed an indictment today charging a New York man, a Florida man and a Canadian national with running a fraudulent mass-mailing scheme that tricked consumers, many of whom were elderly and vulnerable, into paying fees for falsely promised cash prizes.</div>
The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York unsealed an indictment today charging a New York man, a Florida man and a Canadian national with running a fraudulent mass-mailing scheme that tricked consumers, many of whom were elderly and vulnerable, into paying fees for falsely promised cash prizes.

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