December 3, 2021

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The Urgent Need to End the Conflict in Ethiopia

4 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

As the conflict in Ethiopia marks a full year, Ethiopian leaders – both inside and outside government and from across the country – face an urgent need to act immediately and alleviate the suffering of the Ethiopian people.  The United States reiterates our deep concern about the risk of intercommunal violence aggravated by bellicose rhetoric on all sides of the conflict, especially on social media.  Inflammatory language fuels the flames of this conflict, pushing a peaceful resolution ever further away.  We are also concerned about reports of arbitrary detentions based on ethnicity in Addis Ababa.

With the safety and security of millions in the balance, and more than 900,000 facing conflict-induced famine-like conditions, we prevail upon all forces to lay down their arms and open dialogue to maintain the unity and integrity of the Ethiopian state.  We call on the Government of Ethiopia to halt its military campaign, including air strikes in population centers in Tigray and mobilization of ethnic militias.  We call on the Government of Eritrea to remove its troop from Ethiopia.  We call on the forces of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and the Oromo Liberation Army (OLA) to immediately stop the current advance towards Addis Ababa.  All parties must also allow and facilitate humanitarian access so that life-saving assistance can reach people in need.  We urge all parties to open ceasefire negotiations without preconditions to find a sustainable path towards peace.  The international community stands ready to assist the Ethiopian people to end this conflict now.

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