January 25, 2022

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The United States Urges an End to Violent Demonstrations in Honiara, Solomon Islands

15 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States is deeply concerned by the recent violence in Honiara, Solomon Islands. We support the rapid restoration of peace and security in Solomon Islands and an end to the violence and unrest that has occurred in recent days. ​

We thank Australia and Papua New Guinea for deploying law enforcement and other personnel to Honiara, following a request by the Government of Solomon Islands, to secure critical infrastructure. The United States also joins Fiji, New Zealand, and other partners in urging the quick return to order in Solomon Islands.​

The United States has enduring ties with Solomon Islands. We call on all parties to refrain from destruction of public and private property and engage in constructive, inclusive dialogue to seek a peaceful resolution to their differences.

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