January 24, 2022

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The United States Takes Actions Against Supporters of the Illegitimate Maduro Regime’s Fraudulent Elections

19 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States has sanctioned Ex-Cle Soluciones Biométricas C.A. (Ex-Cle C.A.) for their support of the illegitimate Maduro regime’s fraudulent December 6 legislative elections.  The Treasury Department action also targets Guillermo Carlos San Agustin and Marcos Javier Machado Requena for having acted for or on behalf of Ex-Cle C.A.  San Augustin, a dual Argentine and Italian national, is a co-director, the administrator, a majority shareholder, and ultimate beneficial owner of Ex-Cle C.A.  Machado, a Venezuelan national, is a co-director, the president, and a minority shareholder of Ex-Cle C.A.

Ex-Cle C.A. has millions of dollars of contracts with the illegitimate Maduro regime, providing electoral hardware and software to regime-aligned government agencies.  Ex-Cle C.A. was aware of and involved in the regime’s efforts to rig the fraudulent December 6 elections, thereby undermining democracy and suppressing the voices of the Venezuelan people.  Ex-Cle C.A. also helped Maduro’s coopted National Electoral Council to purchase thousands of voting machines from China, routing payments thru the Russian financial system.  They shipped the voting machines through Iran using rogue airlines Mahan Air and Conviasa, both previously targeted by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

Those who seek to undermine free and fair elections in Venezuela must be held accountable.  Maduro’s reliance on companies like Ex-Cle C.A., as well as recently-sanctioned PRC tech firm CEIEC, to rig the electoral processes should leave no doubt that the December 6 legislative elections were fraudulent and do not reflect the will of the Venezuelan people.  We urge all countries committed to democracy to condemn the fraudulent December 6 elections and the illegitimate regime’s continuing efforts to destroy democracy in Venezuela.

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