December 6, 2021

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The United States Designates Al Qa’ida Financial Facilitator

15 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Today, the United States continued to disrupt the financial and logistical networks that support Al Qa’ida (AQ) operations in the Middle East and around the world by designating a financial facilitator.  Ahmed Luqman Talib is being designated pursuant to Executive Order 13224 for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial or material support for, or goods or services to or in support of, AQ.  Additionally, the company Talib and Sons, which is owned, controlled, or directed by Talib, is being designated.

Ahmed Luqman Talib is involved in operational and facilitation activities on behalf of Al Qa’ida, in furtherance of AQ objectives.

Talib and Sons PTY LTD, a gemstone company located in Australia, is owned, controlled, or directed by Ahmed Luqman Talib.  Talib has had financial dealings in a number of countries, and his business dealing in gemstones has provided him the ability to move funds internationally for the benefit of AQ.

The United States has made significant progress in degrading AQ’s support networks around the world.  We will not relent in our efforts to target AQ’s terrorist activities and those who support them.

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