December 3, 2021

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The United States Condemns the Houthi Detention of Yemeni Staff of the U.S. Embassy in Sana’a and Breach of Embassy Compound

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States condemns the Houthis’ detention and mistreatment of dozens of Yemeni citizens and their family members simply because they have worked for the United States in Sana’a in a caretaker capacity since the U.S. Embassy there suspended operations in 2015.  Several of these employees are still being held.  The Houthis’ unprovoked abuse of these Yemeni citizens is a gross disregard of diplomatic norms, as is the Houthis’ flagrant breach of the compound used by the U.S. Embassy prior to 2015.  These actions are an affront to the entire international community.  The Houthis must immediately release unharmed all Yemeni employees of the United States, vacate the Embassy compound, return seized property, and cease their threats.  The United States is actively engaged in this matter and is consulting closely with our international partners, including fellow members of the United Nations Security Council.

 

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