January 25, 2022

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The United States Condemns the Conviction of the Citgo 6

7 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States unequivocally condemns the wrongful convictions of the Citgo 6, in a proceeding that should be described as a kangaroo court.  After canceling their initial appearance before a judge dozens of times over the last three years, the illegitimate Venezuelan legal system suddenly convicted and sentenced these oil executives without any evidence.  Having already spent over three years wrongfully detained in Venezuela on these specious charges, the majority of the time in horrific prison conditions, these six individuals should be immediately returned to the United States.

 

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

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