January 25, 2022

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The United States Condemns Attack on Saudi Arabia

9 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States strongly condemns the latest attack on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We are gathering more information, but it appears to have been an attempt to target civilians. Such attacks contravene international law and undermine all efforts to promote peace and stability. As we work to de-escalate tensions in the region through principled diplomacy, including by bringing an end to the war in Yemen, we will also help our partner Saudi Arabia defend against attacks on its territory and hold those who attempt to undermine stability to account.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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