December 9, 2021

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The United States Applauds the OAS Resolution Condemning the Undemocratic Electoral Process and Repression in Nicaragua

7 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

This week’s resounding vote at the Organization of American States (OAS) underscores that member states emphatically condemn President Ortega and Vice President Murillo’s undemocratic electoral process and ongoing repression. With 26 countries voting in favor and zero votes against, this latest OAS action demonstrates that the Ortega-Murillo government stands isolated without supporters in a region committed to democratic principles.

The Nicaraguan government, along with other governments in the Americas, made a democratic commitment to its citizens, as laid out in the Inter-American Democratic Charter. Nicaragua joined the Charter twenty years ago, resolving that its citizens have a right to democracy, and the Nicaraguan government has an obligation to promote and defend that right. President Ortega and Vice President Murillo have failed to honor this commitment by preparing a sham election devoid of credibility, by silencing and arresting opponents, and, ultimately, by attempting to establish an authoritarian dynasty unaccountable to the Nicaraguan people.

This OAS resolution reflects the region’s resounding commitment to democracy and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms in the Americas. The United States continues to work with partners in the region and across the world to promote accountability for those who support Ortega and Murillo’s anti-democratic actions, just as we continue to press the Nicaraguan government to restore civil and political rights and immediately and unconditionally release political prisoners.

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