December 4, 2021

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The United States Announces $25 Million to Support Access to Clean Nuclear Energy

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Office of the Spokesperson

Today at the UN Climate Change Conference, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Bonnie Jenkins announced the United States’ commitment of $25 million in support towards expanding access to clean nuclear energy.  The announcement, also called a “Nuclear Futures Package,” represents efforts from across the U.S. government, and includes ongoing programs and projects under development to:

  • advance large-scale, clean, and modern nuclear power generation,
  • demonstrate the potential of nuclear-produced hydrogen to fuel the transition to clean energy, and
  • advance innovative, secure, and safe nuclear technologies such as small modular reactors.

As part of the Nuclear Futures Package, the United States is pleased to partner with Poland, Kenya, Ukraine, Brazil, Romania, and Indonesia, among others, to support progress on meeting their nuclear energy goals.  Efforts include capacity building, equipment, feasibility and siting studies, demonstration projects, study tours, site visits, technical collaboration, and more.

Included in this commitment is the Foundational Infrastructure for the Responsible Use of Small Modular Reactor Technology (FIRST) Initiative, which the United States launched at the Leaders’ Summit on Climate.  Also included is the U.S. SMR Public Private Program and associated Small Modular and Advanced Reactor Standards and Regulations Workshop Series.  These programs are designed to support key steps necessary for the safe, secure, and responsible deployment of emerging nuclear technologies.

The Nuclear Futures Package underscores the United States’ strong commitment to energy innovation and nuclear technology as an important component of achieving global climate change goals.  In addition to Department of State, these activities are carried out by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency and the Departments of Commerce and Energy.

For more information, please contact the Department of State’s Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation press team @ISN-Press-DL.

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