January 24, 2022

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The United States and Turkmenistan Hold Annual Bilateral Consultations

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Office of the Spokesperson

Today, the United States and Turkmenistan concluded three days of productive Annual Bilateral Consultations (ABCs). The senior-level delegations led by Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asia Dean Thompson and Turkmenistan Deputy Chairman and Foreign Minister Rashid Meredov covered a range of key bilateral and regional topics focused on security, political, and economic issues.

The Turkmen and U.S. delegations emphasized the significance of their growing military cooperation, successes in building people-to-people ties, and opportunities for U.S. companies to expand business and investment in Turkmenistan. The U.S. delegation offered increased cooperation to assist Turkmenistan in addressing labor rights, religious freedom, and other fundamental rights.

Through the Annual Bilateral Consultations, the C5+1 regional diplomatic platform, and other high-level dialogues, the United States looks forward to strengthening its relationship with Turkmenistan, an important partner in a region of global significance.

For further information, please follow the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs on Twitter @State_SCA or contact the bureau at SCA-Press@state.gov.

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