December 9, 2021

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The U.S. Government Supports the Cuban People’s Ability to Demonstrate

9 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States strongly condemns the Cuban regime’s decision to deny permission for peaceful protests to take place on November 15.  By refusing to allow these demonstrations, the Cuban regime clearly demonstrates that it is unwilling to honor or uphold the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Cubans.  

 

The Cuban regime’s denial comes after it announced its intent to position troops on the Cuban streets from November 18-20 to intimidate Cubans and quash the previously-scheduled, nationwide peaceful protests. These latest moves add to the repressive response to the July 11protests that people in Cuba and around the world witnessed.

 

The United States remains deeply committed to the Cuban people, their right to assemble peacefully and express themselves, and their struggle to freely choose their leadership and their future.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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