January 24, 2022

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The U.S.’ Action Against Belarusian Individuals Involved in Efforts To Undermine Belarusian Democracy

8 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Today, in response to the continued, brutal repression of peaceful, pro-democracy protesters in Belarus, the United States and the European Union have taken coordinated action against Belarusian individuals involved in efforts to undermine Belarusian democracy.  The U.S. Departments of Treasury and State have exercised separate authorities against 25 Belarusians involved in the 2020 election falsification and human rights violations, joining 16 Belarusian officials sanctioned in 2006 for similar actions, for a total of 41 Belarusian officials.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has sanctioned eight additional Belarusian officials for their roles in falsifying results of the August 9, 2020, presidential election and the crackdown that followed, pursuant to Executive Order 13405. They include prominent members of Alyaksandr Lukashenka’s regime and security apparatus complicit in the violent crackdown on peaceful election-related protests.  Those sanctioned today join a group of 16 individuals and nine entities, including Alyaksandr Lukashenka and Central Election Commission Chair Yarmoshina, already sanctioned under E.O. 13405.  Those designated will be prohibited from any dealing with U.S. persons or dealings within the United States (including transactions transiting the United States) that involve any property or interests in property of blocked or designated persons.  Any entities owned 50 percent or more by designated persons are also blocked.

In addition, the U.S. Department of State has taken action pursuant to Presidential Proclamation 8015 to identify 24 Belarusian individuals responsible for undermining Belarusian democracy and impose visa restrictions on them, which makes them generally ineligible for entry into the United States.  Some officials have been named under both authorities.

The United States will continue to demand accountability from the Belarusian government for its suppression of democracy, including from those Belarusian officials designated today and the 16 who remain sanctioned.  Today’s coordinated action with The European Union demonstrates our strong and continuing commitment to the Belarusian people, who are peacefully demanding their voices be heard, as well as their right to select a leader through free and fair elections.

For more information about today’s actions, please see the Department of the Treasury’s press release: https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm1143.

 

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