January 20, 2022

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The Republic of Kenya’s National Day

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I congratulate all Kenyans on the celebration of Kenya’s 57th Jamhuri Day.

As our nations continue to develop our already longstanding ties, it is important to reflect on some of our mutual successes.  We welcome the progress of the Bilateral Strategic Dialogue that has led to stronger economic and commercial partnerships and the creation of new opportunities for exporters and consumers.  We have made significant strides together in advancing greater regional stability.  Together we have worked closely to enhance Kenya’s health sector and to meet the challenges of COVID-19 and other infectious disease threats.  Increasing economic prosperity, advancing the health of our populations, and promoting democratic values will contribute further to improvements for both our peoples.

I take this opportunity to extend best wishes to the Kenyan people for a joyous independence anniversary.

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