January 20, 2022

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The Kyrgyz Republic Travel Advisory

7 min read

Do not travel to Kyrgyzstan due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Kyrgyzstan due to COVID-19.  

Kyrgyzstan has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kyrgyzstan.

Read the country information page

If you decide to travel to the Kyrgyz Republic:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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