January 24, 2022

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The International Visitor Leadership Program: Celebrating 80 Years

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Office of the Spokesperson

To mark the 80th anniversary of the International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP), the U.S. Department of State will host a virtual reception and storytelling workshop on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 at 2:30 p.m. ET entitled, “My IVLP Moment.” The virtual event will close the yearlong anniversary celebration of the IVLP and highlight opportunities to increase connections between the United States and other countries.

The program will feature opening remarks by Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs Marie Royce and special video remarks from former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and IVLP alumnus Tony Blair. IVLP alumni from around the world, U.S. nonprofit partners, and representatives from Congressional offices will join the virtual reception. The nonprofit StoryCenter will facilitate a storytelling workshop to help the IVLP network underscore the historic legacy of the program and the transformational power of international exchanges.

For the past 80 years, the IVLP has connected current and emerging leaders from around the world to the United States through short-term exchanges. With over 225,000 alumni, the program continues to build vital linkages that benefit both the U.S. and IVLP participants’ home countries. Throughout 2020, the State Department has highlighted 80 accomplished IVLP alumni and the impact of their experiences on the global community. Register for the celebration and workshop at: https://eca.state.gov/facesofexchange.

For press inquiries, contact the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at ECA-Press@state.gov. Follow #FacesOfExchange on social media for updates and highlights of the yearlong celebration.

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