January 25, 2022

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The Election in Honduras

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States congratulates the people of Honduras on their election and Xiomara Castro on her historic victory as Honduras’ first female president. We look forward to working with the next government of Honduras. We congratulate Hondurans for the high voter turnout, peaceful participation, and active civil society engagement that marked this election, signaling an enduring commitment to the democratic process.

The United States and Honduras enjoy a long-standing relationship grounded in shared values, commerce, culture, and family ties.  The United States will continue to support Honduras in strengthening its democratic institutions, promoting economic growth, and fighting corruption and transnational crime.

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