December 9, 2021

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The 53rd Anniversary of the Founding of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I am pleased to congratulate the ten member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the ASEAN Secretariat on the 53rd anniversary of the founding of ASEAN on August 8.  For decades, ASEAN has fostered a more stable, prosperous, and peaceful region.  ASEAN and ASEAN-led mechanisms are at the heart of the U.S. vision for the Indo-Pacific and that of our allies and partners.  The strategic partnership between the United States and ASEAN contributes to our shared vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific.

The United States and the countries of ASEAN have partnered in myriad ways to battle COVID-19.  Despite the enormous challenge presented by the pandemic, we are proving the strength of our relationship by leveraging our government, private sector, and charitable partnerships to support our shared health and prosperity.  The United States has pledged nearly $85 million in emergency health and humanitarian assistance to help ASEAN countries battle COVID-19 and we will continue to promote transparent economic growth between our countries during the post-pandemic recovery.  The United States looks forward to many more years of partnership with ASEAN.

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