January 26, 2022

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Thailand Travel Advisory

18 min read

Exercise increased caution in Thailand due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Thailand due to COVID-19.   

Thailand’s borders are still closed for all foreign nationals with few exceptions.  Thailand has resumed most domestic transportation options, (including airport operations) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Thailand.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Thailand.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla provinces due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Thailand:

Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla Provinces – Reconsider Travel

Periodic violence directed mostly at Thai government interests by a domestic insurgency continues to affect security in the southernmost provinces of Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla. U.S. citizens are at risk of death or injury due to the possibility of indiscriminate attacks in public places. Martial law is in force in this region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these provinces as U.S government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these provinces.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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