January 25, 2022

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Thailand National Day

14 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I extend my best wishes to the people of Thailand as you celebrate your National Day.

In more than two centuries of friendship, the United States and Thailand have strengthened cooperation in all sectors, from bilateral trade to international law enforcement to public health. We are committed to elevating the economic, security, health, and people-to-people ties that exist between our two countries, further strengthening our alliance and partnership.  In the coming year, as we work together to build back better and emerge stronger from the COVID-19 pandemic, we welcome Thailand’s leadership in the region and beyond.

Congratulations to all the people of Thailand on this important day, and I wish you a peaceful and prosperous year ahead.

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