December 5, 2021

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Terrorist Attacks in Niger

16 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States strongly condemns the horrific terrorist attacks in Niger, the most recent of which tragically killed 137 civilians on March 21 in the Tahoua region.  We are deeply concerned by the increasing violence against civilians and call for those responsible to be held accountable to the full extent of the law.

The United States stands with the Nigerien people as they enter a period of mourning for the victims.  We remain committed to working together with the Government and security forces of Niger to counter violent extremism and ensure security and prosperity for all Nigeriens.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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